Celebrating Our Centenarians

Centenarians

Celebrating Our Centenarians

Centenarians

Reflections on a century of life, a lifetime of memories.

 

Dona Quick

Peakview Assisted Living & Memory Care
Centennial, Colorado

Some people say that they have had difficult experiences but have learned important lessons from them. Is that true?

Yes, very true. I lost my husband. He was sick a lot and had three heart surgeries. I learned to be more accepting of other people’s difficulties.

As you look back over your life, do you see any key experiences that changed your life?

The loss of my husband — I had never been alone. We were married 53 years. When I was 80 years old, I ran across a fellow from college who had also lost his wife. We started seeing each other and then we lived together. We had a good life together. He was my first love before my husband. We had the same birthday and looked forward to celebrating together, but due to his hip breaking we were separated, as he stayed in California, and I moved to Colorado to be closer to family.

Did you have any heroes or role models when you were a child?

President Franklin D. Roosevelt brought us out of the terrible war.

What inventions do you most remember?

The telephone. You could crank or dial them. And records. Dad would always bring a new one home for the music box.

What’s the most memorable family vacation you took?

Every summer all the Mormon families would have a family reunion in the canyons of southern Utah. I saw cousins and had a good time.

Dona Quick passed away peacefully on October 30, 2016.


John Most john-most

Gardens at Ocotillo Senior Living 
Chandler, Arizona

John Most was born in Detroit, Michigan, where he lived for 62 years. He was married two times — first to Esther for 40 years, then to Eva for 15 years.

John has one daughter, Kathy, and two stepchildren. He also has two grandchildren and eight stepgrandchildren. Family is very important to John. He loved his parents, his brother and both of his wives dearly.

After completing high school and trade school, John was an accomplished tool and die maker. He also successfully bought and flipped houses after retirement and into his 80s.

Some people say that they have had difficult or stressful experiences but they have learned important lessons from them. Is that true for you? Can you give examples of what you have learned?

I lost my father in my early 20s, and my mother was no longer in the home. I had to become the physical and financial support for my brother, Donald. I have always taken care of others, and that experience has made me a more caring and nurturing person.

What big world events do you remember from the time you were growing up?

During my life I have seen the first airplane and the first walk on the moon.

What’s the best compliment you ever received?

Every time I hear my grandkids say, “I love you, Grandpa.”

What have you liked best about your life so far? What’s your happiest or proudest moment?

Playing a part in my grandchildren graduating from college.

What have been the most influential experiences in your life?

Getting to know Henry Ford and being influenced by his passion for quality.


martha-12Martha Svob

Gardens at Ocotillo Senior Living 
Chandler, Arizona

Martha June Morgan was born in Charleston, Illinois, the youngest of three with a brother, William, and sister, Virginia.

At an early age, she moved to Jacksonville, Illinois, with her family, where she went on to graduate from MacMurray College with a degree in physical education and business.

She worked briefly as a secretary in Chicago before returning to central Illinois to begin teaching in a high school.

She met and later married a science teacher, Thomas Svob, who served in the Navy during WWII. Martha and Tom were married June 21, 1942.

Martha gave birth to the couple’s only child, Judith Kaye Svob, on March 21, 1944.

After 68 wonderful years of marriage, Tom passed away in 2010. Martha moved to Chandler, Arizona, to live with her daughter, Judi, and Judi’s husband, Mike, in 2014. One year later she moved again — this time to Gardens at Ocotillo Senior Living.  

She is the proud grandmother of Michael, Mary and Amanda and the proud great-grandmother of five beautiful girls: Meara, Willow, Olive, K’lei and Brooklyn.

What’s the secret to a happy marriage?

Give as much as you can to others and only get married if you are in LOVE!

What’s your first, most vivid memory?

Being a big tease with boys.

What inventions do you most remember? Why?

TV! Before that we listened to the radio.

How is growing older affecting you? What’s been the best thing about growing older?

I’m able to get around well compared to others, and having great-grandkids is the best.

What have you enjoyed most about your life so far?

My grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.


Virginia “Ginny” Falberg
Greatest Generation

Rigden Farm Senior Living
Fort Collins, Colorado

As you look back over your life, were there any major events or experiences that changed the course of your life?

Yes – Pearl Harbor news made me enlist in the U.S. Army as a nurse. I served in Iceland, England and France.

What would you say you know now about living a happy and successful life that you didn’t know when you were younger?

Be tolerant of people’s personalities and their goals before getting married.

What would you say are the major values or principles that you live by?

Tolerance of faith. Points of views may vary, but some people judge you by your faith, and we should be more tolerant.

What’s different about growing up today from when you were growing up?

There is more to be apprehensive about. Children cannot run free due to dangers that they didn’t have when we were growing up.

What’s the most memorable family vacation you took?

The World’s Fair in Washington, then driving to Canada.

What’s the best compliment you ever received?

A patient who was in pain told me that I made her more comfortable (which was my job).

Is there anything you wish you’d done differently in your life?

I would have been more stern with my two sons over their schoolwork, but they both graduated college.

What have you liked best about your life so far? What’s your happiest or proudest moment?

Being alive! The happiest or proudest moment was when I became a grandmother. I wondered, “Where did this come from — how did this happen so fast?”


ginni-falberg-picture

Virginia “Ginny” Falberg

Palmilla Senior Living
Albuquerque, New Mexico

What are some of the most important lessons you feel you have learned over the course of your life?

Family is the most important part of your life, to have a solid family.

As you look back, do you see any key experiences that changed your life?

Getting married did. Although it had its ups
and downs, it changed my life, as well as having two children.

Did you have any heroes or role models when you were a child?

My mother (Christina, went by Tina). She was a good, loving, beautiful lady. She knitted, crocheted, she was an artist; she painted china amongst other paintings.

What inventions do you most remember?

The telephone. Now you can have a phone anywhere—in your car, in your room, anywhere.

What’s the most memorable family vacation you took?

I had many trips to Europe. We went everywhere — France, London, etc. We also traveled to South America, my husband and I.

Who has been the most influential person in your life?

My mother has been the most influential person in my life. I hope to see her again one day.


Frances McKeownCentenarian

Villas of Shelby Senior Living
Shelby Township, Michigan

Frances was born at home in Detroit. In the early 1900s, only about five percent of mothers delivered their babies in hospitals. She lived on a 20-acre farm on what is now the famous Eight Mile Road in the city of Detroit. Frances completed 12th grade and then began working at the famous J.L. Hudson’s in downtown Detroit. She worked in sales. She liked her job very much. Frances married her husband Russel. She was married for more than 50 years before her husband passed in 1991. The two never had any children. Frances has lived alone all of this time at her home in Warren, Michigan, before moving to the Villas.

What is your secret to a happy marriage?

Pick someone compatible with you. Russel and I never fought.

What is your most vivid memory growing up?

I was poor. I remember I wanted a doll so badly. So, for Christmas that year, I received a doll. That was my only gift.

What do you think is the hardest thing about getting older?

Being alone. Everyone around you begins to pass. My whole family is gone, and Russel and I never had any children.

What do you think is the best thing about growing older?

Living in a senior community like this one. I don’t have to lift a finger. I don’t have to cook, my laundry is done, my house is clean; I can just enjoy life.

What is something that you are proud of?

I stopped driving in 1997 when I was 80 years old.

What has been the happiest moment in your life so far?

My wedding day.

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